The Dangers Of Puberty

Meet Adam, a normal nineteen year old man. Adam lives in a village in eastern europe in the eighteenth century and he’s a werewolf.

Adam had a pretty normal life as a boy. His father died when he was young and he was raised by his mother as a good, God-fearing man. Things were actually going quite well for Adam until he hit puberty. That’s when things started to get a bit sinister.

At first he was growing into a fine man and many of the girls around the vilage had expressed their interest in him. But his body wasn’t done growing yet. Testosterone kept being pumped through his system in incredible doses causing several adverse side effects. The most obvious to onlookers was the constant hair growth. People said that Adam could shave in the morning and have several days beard growth by the time lunch was ready. His friends started to stay away from him as he displayed increasingly frequent bouts of aggression.

By the time Adam was fifteen he was taller and more muscular than any man in the village. Again due to the testosterone flooding his system, his voice has deepened so much that it’s barely above a bestial growl.

Two days before Adam’s sixteenth birthday the local priest had to be called by his mother. Rumours had started to circulate that the changes Adam was going through were down to possession by some form of demon. The rumours were helped along by the fact that no-one had ever witnessed Adam sleep in over a year and he could regularly be found wandering the village at all times of night. Luckily for Adam he did sleep occasionally, although his testosterone soaked system could last for a couple of days without and then only need a few hours. On this particular night the boy was asleep and the priest, witnessing this, soon ended the rumours about him.

When Adam was seventeen he watched a play put on by travellers where a man became a wolf and terrorised the countryside before being killed by a hunter.

By the time Adam had turned eighteen he was a huge muscular man. He’d stopped shaving and sported a mass of tangled matted hair. The women in the village had stopped paying attention to him and the men stayed away from him due to the constantly brewing rage that bubbled beneath the surface.

Small animals had started to disappear that year and Adam was the natural one to blame. For once the people in the village are right. Adam had taken the play he saw the previous year to heart. For him it was the only explanation for what was happening to him. Combined with his annoyance at the fear displayed by his friends, Adam decided to give his village something to truly fear.

Meet Adam, a normal nineteen year old man. Gummed to his thumb nail is a small, jagged piece of horn. Adam’s friend once told him that you could use that to cut purses from nobles without them noticing, but Adam is after a bigger prey than coin. Using his new “claw” he slits the throat of the man he’s been stalking for the past half hour and begins to feed.

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76 thoughts on “The Dangers Of Puberty

  1. It's a theory I put forward about Lycanthropy. Basically you take someone with a hyper-extended metabolism (in this case puberty) where the hormones are flying and changing things left, right and centre. Now get that person stuck in that state for the physical traits and some of the pychological traits. Combine that with a broken psyche due to some form of torture (in this case the constant bullying and mistrust shown by the entire village he grew up in) and voila, instant werewolf.The version I put forward was less story telling and more biologically and psychologically detailed, but it'd make for boring reading here. However the extra detail went into many aspects of the werewolf and covered them through different applications of the two main principles here.

  2. Legend. Just like the vampire rising from the grave.This is part of my new project by the way, albeit changed from it's original form. I thought I'd be able to get hold of my original essays from my old universitys computers by using Kim's gran's computer. They're not online anymore though. :(The idea was to copy and paste the essays into my page and set up several Wikipedia links for when I used technical terms.If this post is popular I'll do a few more from memory, possibly going into more detail.

  3. My stuff all got purged within a year of me leaving uni. All i rescued were my old emails.But as i did a maths degree, i don't think the world is poorer for the purging :lol:.Are/were the essays all about things like this?

  4. That makes sense… in a way.. but the pic doesn't do it justice… in other regards it would be believeable if you insert a pic of the real wolf boys..

  5. Yeah I used to have one included in the original essay.I thought this way added a nice counter point to show the legend and the reality. Maybe if I move the image to after the first paragraph? But there's a lot going on in the top half with the links…

  6. Dan unless you're one of those people who believe homosexuals have something wrong with them, then no, it can't really be applied that way.There may well be ways to apply psychology and biology to come up with a theoretical reason for homosexuality, but it wouldn't cover everyone.

  7. ADAM?? :eyes:

    Dan unless you're one of those people who believe homosexuals have something wrong with them

    Mate, I listen to Darren Hayes since Savage Garden's early years and me mum used to make me dance to the beat of Erasure as I child, believe, homosexuality is something I admire ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

  8. okay Adam, now stop that ridiculous attitude of yours. i don't like being tickled. you're not a werewolf. keep that in your mind. now be a good boy… sit. no… stop sniffing… sit… i'll give ya the biscuit later

  9. Yet again my work here is done. All the makers of psychological medication will pay me handsomely for putting you crazies together to drive each other even more insane.

  10. That's because lycans are simple creatures. My vampire paper was almost 50 pages before the bibliography.I will eventually put a heavily abridged version on here.

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